Personal Items

Bootscraper.

 

Victorian cast-iron boot-scraper donated by Gerald Williams and his daughter Anna Williams.  This was used by William Willliams and also by his son Bishop Leonard Williams.  William undertook long journeys by foot, often in very muddy conditions.  

 

Leonard inherited his father's interest in exploration and was a keen botanist, riding or walking around his large diocese. A native broom he discovered was named after him – Carmichaelia  williamsii.

 

 

 

Bootscraper.

 

Victorian cast-iron boot-scraper donated by Gerald Williams and his daughter Anna Williams.  This was used by William Willliams and also by his son Bishop Leonard Williams.  William undertook long journeys by foot, often in very muddy conditions.  

 

Leonard inherited his father's interest in exploration and was a keen botanist, riding or walking around his large diocese. A native broom he discovered was named after him – Carmichaelia  williamsii.

 

 

 

Parasol

 

A black lace over silk parasol owned by Jane Williams, wife of Henry's eldest son Edward. Donated by Peggie Bannister who recalls her mother remembering her grandmother using it to sheild herself  from the sun when in a horse-drawn carriage.  The parasol has a plain handle but the lace and ruffles are surprisingly frivolous for the daughter and daughter-in-law of CMS missionaries.  Jane's father was missionary Richard Davis.  Edward, a brilliant Maori linguist, was a Resident Magistrate and subsequently a Judge of the Native Land Court.

 

 

GENERAL ITEMS.

 

Here is a collection of single items that are owned by either the Trust or family members.  

 

These include the Bootscraper, The Ships Bell from the Herald, and the Clock.  Scroll through the images to read about each item.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Baby Clothes

 

Three boxes of “Williams” baby clothes, other clothing and textiles have been donated by Peggie Bannister and Margot Goodin.  A star of this varied collection is an ornately embroidered baby cap which has been dated as late 18th Century.  This might have been made for Marianne or her siblings, and kept by her for her own children. Among the other items are some christening robes and hand-made children’s clothes.  

 

 

Textiles.

 

From a box of fabric items donated by Peggie Bannister and Margot Goodin.

Items include pieces of lace, a pillowslip and an embroidered sampler.

Hukarere Dolls

 

Three tiny dolls dating from the early 19th Century and which had belonged to the daughters of William Williams.  These were donated by Patience Kearns and came from Hukarere, the house in Napier belonging to the three unmarried daughters, Maria, Kate and Mariannne. Known in the family as the Hukarere aunts, they all lived into their nineties and were notable personalities, especially because of their association with the founding of the Hukarere School for Maori girls.  The dolls average about 10 cms in length and have ceramic heads and limbs, with cloth bodies.  Two are in their original dresses and are badly worn, indicating they were much loved playthings.

 

 

 

Carved Box

 

​© 2013 H & W Williams Memorial Museum Trust.  All rights reserved.

 

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